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Archive for October 2008

Studs Terkel, Chicago Journalism Icon, Dead at 96

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Author-radio host-actor-activist and Chicago symbol Louis “Studs” Terkel died at his home on the North Side today. He was 96.

Terkel’s health took a turn for the worse when he suffered a fall in his home two weeks ago. He had been in declining health for a long time.

Here is a link to coverage in the Chicago Tribune.

Here is a link to his web site, which chronicles his life. The world is a poorer place without him tonight.

Studs Terkel, prize-winning author and radio broadcast personality was born Louis Terkel in New York on May 16, 1912. His father, Samuel, was a tailor and his mother, Anna (Finkel) was a seamstress. He had three brothers. The family moved to Chicago in 1922 and opened a rooming house at Ashland and Flournoy on the near West side. From 1926 to 1936 they ran another rooming house, the Wells-Grand Hotel at Wells Street and Grand Avenue. Terkel credits his knowledge of the world to the tenants who gathered in the lobby of the hotel and the people who congregated in nearby Bughouse Square, a meeting place for workers, labor organizers, dissidents, the unemployed, and religious fanatics of many persuasions. In 1939 he married Ida Goldberg and had one son.

Terkel attended University of Chicago and received a law degree in 1934. He chose not to pursue a career in law. After a brief stint with the civil service in Washington D.C., he returned to Chicago and worked with the WPA Writers Project in the radio division. One day he was asked to read a script and soon found himself in radio soap operas, in other stage performances, and on a WAIT news show. After a year in the Air Force, he returned to writing radio shows and ads. He was on a sports show on WBBM and then, in 1944, he landed his own show on WENR. This was called the Wax Museum show that allowed him to express his own personality and play recordings he liked from folk music, opera, jazz, or blues. A year later he had his own television show called Stud’s Place and started asking people the kind of questions that marked his later work as an interviewer.

In 1952 Terkel began working for WFMT, first with the “Studs Terkel Almanac” and the “Studs Terkel Show,” primarily to play music. The interviewing came along by accident. This later became the award-winning, “The Studs Terkel Program.” His first book, Giants of Jazz, was published in 1956. Ten years later his first book of oral history interviews, Division Street : America, came out. It was followed by a succession of oral history books on the 1930s Depression, World War Two, race relations, working, the American dream, and aging. His latest book, Will the Circle Be Unbroken : Reflections on Death, Rebirth, and Hunger for a Faith, was published in 2001. Terkel continues to interview people, work on his books, and make public appearances. He is Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at the Chicago Historical Society.

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Written by newscycle

October 31, 2008 at 7:00 pm

Posted in Terkel

Studs Terkel, Chicago Journalism Icon, Dead at 96

leave a comment »


Author-radio host-actor-activist and Chicago symbol Louis “Studs” Terkel died at his home on the North Side today. He was 96.

Terkel’s health took a turn for the worse when he suffered a fall in his home two weeks ago. He had been in declining health for a long time.

Here is a link to coverage in the Chicago Tribune.

Here is a link to his web site, which chronicles his life. The world is a poorer place without him tonight.

Studs Terkel, prize-winning author and radio broadcast personality was born Louis Terkel in New York on May 16, 1912. His father, Samuel, was a tailor and his mother, Anna (Finkel) was a seamstress. He had three brothers. The family moved to Chicago in 1922 and opened a rooming house at Ashland and Flournoy on the near West side. From 1926 to 1936 they ran another rooming house, the Wells-Grand Hotel at Wells Street and Grand Avenue. Terkel credits his knowledge of the world to the tenants who gathered in the lobby of the hotel and the people who congregated in nearby Bughouse Square, a meeting place for workers, labor organizers, dissidents, the unemployed, and religious fanatics of many persuasions. In 1939 he married Ida Goldberg and had one son.

Terkel attended University of Chicago and received a law degree in 1934. He chose not to pursue a career in law. After a brief stint with the civil service in Washington D.C., he returned to Chicago and worked with the WPA Writers Project in the radio division. One day he was asked to read a script and soon found himself in radio soap operas, in other stage performances, and on a WAIT news show. After a year in the Air Force, he returned to writing radio shows and ads. He was on a sports show on WBBM and then, in 1944, he landed his own show on WENR. This was called the Wax Museum show that allowed him to express his own personality and play recordings he liked from folk music, opera, jazz, or blues. A year later he had his own television show called Stud’s Place and started asking people the kind of questions that marked his later work as an interviewer.

In 1952 Terkel began working for WFMT, first with the “Studs Terkel Almanac” and the “Studs Terkel Show,” primarily to play music. The interviewing came along by accident. This later became the award-winning, “The Studs Terkel Program.” His first book, Giants of Jazz, was published in 1956. Ten years later his first book of oral history interviews, Division Street : America, came out. It was followed by a succession of oral history books on the 1930s Depression, World War Two, race relations, working, the American dream, and aging. His latest book, Will the Circle Be Unbroken : Reflections on Death, Rebirth, and Hunger for a Faith, was published in 2001. Terkel continues to interview people, work on his books, and make public appearances. He is Distinguished Scholar-in-Residence at the Chicago Historical Society.

Written by newscycle

October 31, 2008 at 7:00 pm

Posted in Terkel

Obama Spokesman: ‘The Dye Is Cast;’ We’ve Won

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Sen. Barack Obama’s campaign manager David Plouffe told reporters via a conference call today that Democrats are encouraged by results of massive get-out-the-vote efforts in early-voting states. The campaign’s inference is that victory is at hand.

Plouffe said the campaign is pleased that a large part of the early vote so far is coming from sporadic and new voters, most of whom they believe are voting for Obama.

“We’re out of the land of theory here in a lot of these states. You’re beginning to see how this election is likely to unfold,” he said. “The dye is being cast even as we speak.”

“We’re always looking for opportunities to expand the map, and these three states are close enough,” Plouffe said. “It’s enough in the realm of possibility that we want to put a little extra effort here at the end.”

The three states he was referring to are Arizona, North Dakota, and Georgia.

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October 31, 2008 at 6:53 pm

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Obama Camp: ‘The Dye Is Being Cast;’ We’ve Won

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Sen. Barack Obama’s campaign manager David Plouffe told reporters via a conference call today that Democrats are encouraged by results of massive get-out-the-vote efforts in early-voting states. The campaign’s inference is that victory is at hand.

Plouffe said the campaign is pleased that a large part of the early vote so far is coming from sporadic and new voters, most of whom they believe are voting for Obama.

“We’re out of the land of theory here in a lot of these states. You’re beginning to see how this election is likely to unfold,” he said. “The dye is being cast even as we speak.”

“We’re always looking for opportunities to expand the map, and these three states are close enough,” Plouffe said. “It’s enough in the realm of possibility that we want to put a little extra effort here at the end.”

The three states he was referring to are Arizona, North Dakota, and Georgia.

Written by newscycle

October 31, 2008 at 6:35 pm

Posted in Obama

Obama Jettisons Reporters From His Campaign Plane

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Sen. Barack Obama’s campaign officials have told reporters from The Washington Times, The Dallas Morning News and The New York Post that they no longer can travel on the candidate’s plane as of Sunday.

All three newspapers have endorsed Sen. John McCain.

“We’re trying to reach as many swing voters that we can and unfortunately had to make some tough choices. but we are accommodating these folks in every way possible,” Obama spokesman Bill Burton told Politico’s Ben Smith. He said the move was to get reporters on the plane who can reach undecided voters in battleground states. New York and Texas are not battleground areas, but northern Virginia, where the Washington Times circulates, is.

Their seats are being used by correspondents from Ebony and Jet magazines.

In the past, McCain had barred liberal columnists Maureen Dowd of The New York Times and Joe Klein from Time magazine from his campaign plane. The difference is that McCain did not eject the reporters from those news organizations. Columnists are paid to express their opinions, and are generally managed outside the news department. They do not report the news. Reporters are bound ethically to report the news without opinions, and generally have no input into a news organization’s editorial page policy.

“This feels like the journalistic equivalent of redistributing the wealth, we spent hundreds of thousands of dollars covering Senator Obama’s campaign, traveling on his plane, and taking our turn in the reporter’s pool, only to have our seat given away to someone else in the last days of the campaign,” said Washington Times Executive Editor John Solomon in his newspaper. “I hope the candidate that promises to unite America isn’t using a litmus test to determine who gets to cover his campaign.”

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October 31, 2008 at 5:34 pm

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Richardson: Obama’s Tax Cut Limit Is Really $120,000

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How low can you go?

Gov. Bill Richardson, a supporter of Sen. Barack Obama, said in a recently radio interview that when Obama becomes president, he would cut taxes for people earning less than $120,000 a year.

Obama’s official position is that the cutoff is at $250,000. But he once said on the stump that the figure is $200,000. Sen. Joe Biden then lowered the bar to $150,000.

Written by newscycle

October 31, 2008 at 4:23 pm

Posted in Obama, Taxes

Richardson: Obama’s Tax Cut Limit Is Really $120,000

with one comment


How low can you go?

Gov. Bill Richardson, a supporter of Sen. Barack Obama, said in a recently radio interview that when Obama becomes president, he would cut taxes for people earning less than $120,000 a year.

Obama’s official position is that the cutoff is at $250,000. But he once said on the stump that the figure is $200,000. Sen. Joe Biden then lowered the bar to $150,000.

Written by newscycle

October 31, 2008 at 4:23 pm

Posted in Obama, Taxes

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